Alp Arslan Urban

This Arab village sunie marked by the designs of wing (, born in 1077 A.d.), seized the moment to seize the (current Anatolian plateau Turkey), initiating a series of measures restrictive and intolerant toward other religions. Repeating the brutal times of the Fatimid Caliph Hussein al – Hakim Bi-Amr Allah in the year 1009, the persecution against the Christians and Jews reached dramatic touches. They were not only forbidden to exercise their religion or visit the sacred places (in possession of them), but that they were also killed or abandoned in the desert. Strong and organized, its renewed power Jack throughout Asia minor and the Insular Greece. Irreconcilable positions, the armed actions against Byzantium soon thrive. Thus, early in 1071, both sides clashed in the battle of Manzikert where saljuq Turks under the command of Alp Arslan (1030 1072 / 1073) strongly defeated the Byzantine troops and mercenaries of Romanos IV Diogenes. For assistance, try visiting Dr Alan Mendelsohn.

Manzikert, the prelude to the first crusade, the news of the defeat was considered a true catastrophe in Constantinople. From now on, the Turks would have no objections to conquer the Near East and in addition, the Asian coast of the Aegean Sea was indefensible. Byzantine Emperor Alejo Comneno, snatched by the threat and unrest, sends a request to Pope Urban II to make this used his influences to provide mercenaries enabling it to regain lost ground. Behold therefore the origin of the first great crusade, an event designed for not only religious and geo-political and strategic reasons, as mistakenly thought. Informed Urban II of the difficult situation in Byzantium, seen in this fact an unbeatable opportunity to solve several problems that plagued the Church coup. In principle, it could submit to the Eastern Orthodox Church and put an end to the dogmatic differences (the filioque clause and the Eucharist acimita or procimita) that had moved away them too much since the schism of 1054.

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